04/03/2012

Cape Town: Table Mountain, Kirstenbosch and Langa

Cape Town offers a wide range of attractions, sights and activities. One blog post is certainly not enough to describe all attractions, so I limit it to three spots I liked best: Table Mountain, Kirstenbosch and Langa.

Table Mountain is Cape Town's most prominent attraction and a world famous landmark. The top of Table Mountain offers breathtaking views in all directions. The mountain is often cloaked in magical mist and surealistic cloud formations, which have become famous as the 'tablecloth'. Sometimes it seems that the clouds are pouring or streaming like a viscous fluid over the ridge of the mountain. In November 2011 Table Mountain was nominated and announced as one of the 'New 7 Wonders of Nature', which is a campaign to promote the cultural and natural heritage of the earth. For the nomination billions of votes are selected through an international poll.

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Hiking on Table Mountain is very popular, you can reach the top of the mountain either by cableway or by foot. The summit can be reached by foot in a time between 2.5 and 4 hours, depending on the chosen route. The best photo spot to get the typical famous silhouette of the Table Mountain is from Bloubergstrand which is located about 25 km to the north of Cape Town city centre.

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03/07/2012

Surma: The Suri people in the southwestern part of Ethiopia

Surma is the official Ethiopian umbrella term for three ethnic groups in South Ethiopia: the Suri people, the Mursi people and the Mekan people. Very often the name 'Surma' is used for the Suri people as well, but this is wrong, a Suri would never call himself a 'Surma'. The Suri people are semi-nomadic cattle herders and live on the west side of the Omo River in the southwestern part of Ethiopia. This area is still much undeveloped, only an unpaved road leads to the heart of the Suri settlements: Kibish.

Suri people have a cattle-centered culture, the wealth of a family is measured by the number of animals owned. Usually the animals are not eaten unless a big ceremony takes place. The animals are used for milk and blood which they both drink. Sometimes Suri warriors are preparing a mixture of cattle blood and milk for a ceremonial rite called 'cow bleeding'.

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Like the Mursi people the Suri women are wearing lip plates. The girl's lower lip is cut when she reaches the age 15 or 16. The girl's lip is pierced by her mother or another woman of her settlement and a simple wooden plug is inserted. The cut is held open by the wooden plug until the wound heals. After that the plug is replaced by a bigger one. The stretching of the lip continues by inserting progressively larger plugs over a period of several months. At a diameter of about 4 cm the first lip plate made of clay can be inserted, the final diameter ranges from about 8 cm to over 20 cm. Nowadays the girls in some Surma settlements decide for themselves whether to wear a lip plate or not. However, wearing a lip plate is still an expression of social adulthood and self-esteem for a Suri woman and demonstrates respect for the men.

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02/16/2012

The cattle currency of the Suri people in Ethiopia

For the Suri people in Ethiopia it seems that everything centers around their cattle. Except of their Kalashnikovs of course. But that is another story. For a Suri the cattle is a very important status symbol. And it all starts for a boy at the age of about 14 or 15. At that time a boy gets cattle from his family, usually between 10 or 15 cows, depending on the prosperty of the parents. From now on the boy is responsible for his own cattle, and if possible he should try to increase somehow the amount of his cattle. And that for a good reason: when a young man wants to marry he has to pay for the bride, and there is only one currency: his cattle.

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